PictureXS 3000

The next batch of 1000 pictures was collected from June 6th to July 12th. More or less one month plus one week. Around 8.3 pictures every day. And as usual, you never know what you’re going to get.

This is picture number 3000, collected last night some time after midnight: Familia Cabrero Figueras, I wonder who you are.

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picturexs3000.jpg

Next is the graph of visits from Google Analytics (April 15th-June 12th). Maximum visits in one day 70, Minimum of 2.
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These are a few Sparklines, also from Google Analytics, that show some global statistics of the site’s usage. It is interesting to observe the difference between visits and pageviews. In May 21st the Maximums for both visits and pageviews were reached, with a count of 70 for the visits and a count of 1367 for the pageviews. This means an average of 20 pictures were looked at by every visitor that day. I should make my own graphics to track down picture submissions, censorship activity, tag contributions, and whatever else I can think about.
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I sometimes feel like I am looking at a digital child growing, when I examine the statistics of the data collecting websites I have made. All the visits and pageviews seem as tangible as the pictures, and I have the illusion that they have been stored like cupcakes in a fridge or books in a bookshelf, but not even the pictures are from this world. They are all bits of information encoded in a way that can be translated into something we can understand. In the digital world, pictures and words have as much weigth as interactions; a collection of mouseclicks can hold more useful information about a particular subject than the cover of the New York Times, and a digital picture’s materiality is not much different from the same collection of mouseclicks, even though it might seem events don’t exist as matter and images do. In the capitalist world, all that can be measured can be attributted value, and this might be the reason why stock markets in the 21st century trade and speculate with mouseclicks as they do with oil, cheese and soap.

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