Archive for the 'animation' Category

Death Planet Rescue at MoPOP

Saturday, May 5th, 2018

Death Planet Rescue, my first immersive science fiction film for the Holodome, just opened to the public at MoPOP in Seattle.

I got to direct an incredible cast including the legendary Michael Ironside, who I remember from the long gone era when I was under eighteen and television was 640×480. I shouldn’t brag but for Death Planet Rescue we managed to push a total of 9600×4800 pixels per frame. That’s an immense picture resolution, but barely enough for the Holodome, who swallows it all and spits it back all around you, making you feel like you stepped into the picture.

I want to thank everyone involved in this production for their creativity and their dedication. We pulled off a crazy one 😀

Sundance 2016

Friday, January 29th, 2016

Waves was a complete success at the New Frontier Exhibit of the Sundance Film Festival this year. I got my Sundance member card and participated in a series of discussions, panels and interviews with many interesting creative people that have a lot to say about virtual reality and storytelling. Here are some of them: @brillhart Principal VR filmmaker at Google, @Saschkaunseld Creative Director at Oculus Story Studio, my creative partners on Waves @BrainDickinson & @ReggieWatts, @PatrickTOsborne Director of Disney’s Feast, @ImmersiveJourno godmother of virtual reality, and @djabatt of course.

IMG_1068

IMG_1230a

Hello Sundance

Friday, December 4th, 2015

Four virtual reality WEVR productions just got selected to be part of the Sundance Film Festival 2016 New Frontiers exhibit. I worked as Creative Director in two of them, Hard World for Small Things and Waves, and I feel quite accomplished to have my name featured in the Sundance Film Festival website surrounded by such a talented group of people.

In particular, Waves is one of two projects where I spent most of my hours this year. It’s pretty cool. It was written and directed by Ben Dickinson, and it features Reggie Watts and Nathalie Emmanuel in a reality bending philosophical-musical comedy, where nothing is what it seems or seems to be what it is. I can’t wait for the day we make it publicly available.

welcometothemind

Wemolab GIF commissions

Tuesday, August 12th, 2014

I have been using tumblr and twitter connect with gif artists in the web and commission them with making small animated loops inspired by the Wemolab logo. Here are some of my favorite results. Beautiful.

By zolloc:

tumblr_nch2u08hsW1tze2b3o1_500

By Dave Whyte:

512

p4_512---a

By Maxwell Ingham:

Max_Ingram_Wemolabs-Logo-512px-Black

Superfugu: Done

Tuesday, April 30th, 2013

Ah, we finally finished this monster, an iPad game called Superfugu by WemoLab, the digital studio formerly known as WemoMedia. I can’t really say we finished it, since it seems the very nature of digital games these days is to be in a perpetual state of flux. This makes sense, since the current state of digital media gives producers access to monitor their audiences’ behaviors, permitting for almost immediate reactions to compensate for negative outcomes. This means “I’ll change what you don’t like before you realize you don’t like it”, and it is after all, what cybernetics are about: an uninterrupted correction feedback loop.

I could spend hours comparing my recent experience of making a game with my long term experience of making movies, drawing analogies and postulating conclusions about what makes things work one way or the other, but I will only do this at a personal level next to a bottle of wine with those who are prepared to indulge me. I have never been a big fan of games the way I am a lover of movies or books, but I find the production of them fascinating from the perspective of management science. I’ve learned more lessons on management —and team hierarchy/dynamics— working on a game than ever before, and this includes the time I spent in the crazy social education, innovation and production experiment called the MIT Media Lab.

I first got involved with Superfugu back around September 2012, and I have been working on it full time until today. I am responsible for the User Interface design and implementation (Unity and Ngui, eek), some character designs (especially the urchins, and all the 2D character versions), aspects of the story (and I got to make the intro comic!), the design/implementation of some features like Parent Mode, and supervising the production of important marketing assets like the Superfugu App Icon (by Oscar Award winner Andy Jones and yours truly, based on Anthony Batt‘s idea).

To me this chapter is done, and I can’t wait to see what’s next. Download Superfugu in the App Store if you have an iPad (available May 1st). Then you can tell me what you think.

fugucito

new-superfugu-2

The Horse Manure Crisis

Wednesday, February 29th, 2012

I just finished a new video for MIT CTL with Max. It is basically a continuation of the video featured in my previous post.

My favorite part of the video narrates the story of the horse manure crisis of the 1890s, where a significant group of world class urban planners predicted that 20th century cities were going to be buried in horse shit by 1930 because of horse population growth, failing to acknowledge cars as a legitimate urban transportation alternative, even though cars had already began to be manufactured commercially. Classic.

Boxing versus Judo

Thursday, January 26th, 2012

Max and I recently finished this video for the MIT Center for Transportation and Logistics. The video illustrates Chris Caplice’s talk on Scenario Planning, a brainstorming technique that helps prepare for abrupt changes in the future.

We use Boxing and Judo to compare between different planning techniques. Boxing represents the traditional approach, based on precise predictions of specific events, and Judo represents Scenario Planning, where it is more important to outline a number of potential futures and prepare for them. This way, specific events become less relevant as the effects they might produce. It makes sense, because lots of different events may cause the same effect over a given system. Preparing for this effect is a lot better strategy than the nearly impossible task of trying to predict each one of these events.