Archive for the 'plw' Category

Openframeworks + Kinect still working

Thursday, July 28th, 2016

Last night I was looking at depthkit and 8i while researching options for video-based 3D capture, and I felt inspired to rescue my old kinect from the bottom of a drawer. I got a fresh copy of openframeworks and ten minutes later I had a running build of the openframeworks kinect example in my computer. It was literally like time-traveling to 2011. I remember capturing a point cloud of Amy pregnant back before Maya was born. A couple of months later the kinect found oblivion in the bottom of a drawer and I stopped using openframeworks until now.



Ten years blogging

Thursday, July 14th, 2016

I still remember exactly ten years from today, when @johnmaeda recommended me to start a blog shortly after I joined the Media Lab under his tutelage. I think he meant that I used it as a tool for self-promotion, but my blogging enterprise promptly evolved into a sort of introspective public journal with an audience of approximately one, myself always included 😀 —and now ten years have passed, ten years since my first WordPress installation and ten years since I wrote this words. I still believe that Information is not Knowledge is not Wisdom is not Love but my priorities, motivations and interests have shifted greatly from that era. This is natural since much has changed around and within me. Even blogs, that felt so new back then —every cool kid had one— feel like archeological artifacts when compared to contemporary digital media. I have grown very fond of this journal, and I will continue writing on it and keeping my little server running for as long as I can. The privilege of having this window to my personal history is priceless.


March was a busy 360 camera month

Friday, April 1st, 2016

Last month I produced and directed three completely different 360 videos for Wevr. This is great, since in the past my job description has been to help other directors conceive, shoot and finish their projects, and it is only recently that I have found the opportunity to not just help others, but do my own thing as well. And there is no better way to do this than working with hula hoop dancers, vintage race car drivers and Chinese smartphone manufacturers, all in the same month.




Mit Media Lab 30th Anniversary

Friday, November 6th, 2015

Just came back from the MIT Media Lab 30th Anniversary celebration. It was a great excuse to spend a few days in Cambridge with the family and reconnect with old friends while catching up with a place where Science Fiction is everyday life.



Casey Reas Linear Perspective

Sunday, September 6th, 2015

Casey Reas just opened a show at the Charlie James Gallery in Chinatown LA last night. It is interesting to see how his generative work has recently shifted from the purely algorithmic —using rules and numbers as a base to create form from scratch— to a deconstructive commentary on media that utilizes content units —like digital photographs and video streams— as a source of [not quite] raw data that generates his quasi abstract forms over an extended period of time. One of his pieces, the one I photographed for this article, retrieves the main photograph from the cover page of the New York Times every day, and uses it as is as a topological stripe that stretches across the digital frame over and over again, weaving a familiar, yet unrecognizable tapestry across the big television screen that Casey chose as his canvas. Well done.



Delicious, 4397 bookmarks later

Sunday, March 8th, 2015

I posted my first bookmark to delicious on 7/13/06, back when it was called In spite of having changed owner a couple of times, and survived a couple of not very fortunate redesigns, delicious might be the online service that I have most consistently used to aggregate annotated content from the web. Gone are the days when I interacted with it socially; most of the users in my network haven’t used it in a very long time, but I still find pleasure using it to collect interesting links and track my browsing preferences by exploring my data. Unlike other services from that era, delicious has kept available a simple API without forcing any horrendous authentication protocols on their users. This has allowed me to keep my delicious tags page alive —a simple sketch where I render all my tags using size and color to visualize frequency of usage. At this point, it’s pretty clear what my favorite webpages and websites are about.


I wonder if any knowledge can be inferred from the tag diversity expressed by an active user in a given amount of time. Does it reflect something about the user’s vocabulary as well as the diversity of their interests? Is there something in common about a group of users that grow their collections of tags and bookmarks at similar rates even if the bookmarks and tags have nothing in common? Can this behavior be evidence of a personal and/or philosophical disposition from users towards knowledge? In section 2.2.2 of Mr. Palomar (The cheese museum), Italo Calvino conjectures that a proclivity towards or against sample diversity will influence —and even shape— the nature of the knowledge acquired from a given experience, in his case, the quest for truth in the appreciation of a particular cheese.

If you have been a delicious user, you can visit my delicious tags page and pass along your username as a parameter. My page will return a nicely crafted version of your delicious data, perhaps helping you learn something you didn’t know about yourself. Here are some examples:,,,,,,,,,,

Celebrating Muntadas

Wednesday, April 23rd, 2014

I just came back from MIT after an amazing weekend participating in the public space? lost & found — symposium and exhibition to celebrate the twenty five years of Muntadas at MIT. Muntadas was my teacher and mentor during my Media Lab years, and has remained a great friend after that, and I was honored to be part of this exhibition with my work on surveillance in the Red line of the MBTA subway system called The Red Line Tour.

It curiously snowed upon my arrival, even though it is almost May, and the city of Boston was in a state of disarray due to the preparations for the 2014 edition of their famous Marathon, but the weather cleared up beautifully and my constant delays didn’t stop me from having a fantastic time hanging out with old friends and making new ones, both in the categories of human friends and place [or location] friends.

I stole the following images from the symposium blog. The picture with the circles shows where I was and where my artwork is. If you are in Cambridge Massachusetts before October 30th this year, please don’t hesitate to visit this exhibition in the MIT Media Lab. The featured Public Art projects are all extremely interesting, and the Media Lab itself is a mind-blowing experience anyway, so just do it, ok?